Yazidis betrayed in Kurdish-Baghdad deal

ezidikhan

The leadership of Ezidikhan, the Yazidi autonomous territory, are protesting¬†a deal reached between Baghdad and the¬†Kurdistan Regional Government¬†(KRG) on the political future of¬†northern Iraq, saying they were not consulted.¬†Ezidikhan¬†Prime Minister Barjis Soso Khalaf said in a statement: “Without the consent of the Yezidi people of Ezidikhan, the Baghdad-Erbil deal is illegitimate and illegal. It tramples upon the right of Yezidis to govern themselves as they see fit.” The statement¬†noted that the UN special representative¬†for Iraq, Jeanie Hennis-Plasschaert,¬†had called for¬†Ezidikhan authorities to be consulted in any deal over the region’s status. The Oct. 9 pact between Iraqi¬†Prime Minister Mustafa al‚ÄďKadhimi and the KRG administration at Erbil calls for creation of a jointly controlled company to exploit the region’s¬†oil resources, ending years of conflict over the question.

But Ezidikhan authorities see their exclusion from the talks as a threat to their hard-won autonomy. “Yezidis were not even invited to the table to discuss the future of their own homeland!” said the statement. It also criticized the US for acquiescing in the deal: “The United States shares complicity in this colonial-style act that wantonly tramples upon Iraqi Yezidis’¬†right to self-determination and self-government, once again sacrificing its vaunted democratic principles on the altar of realpolitik.”

  1. Yazidis crown new spiritual leader

    Yazidis crowned a new spiritual leader at their holiest site of Lalish in northern Iraq, nearly two months after the death of the group’s top cleric. Ali Alyas was formally named as the new “Baba Sheikh.” In his 40s, he is relatively young to receive the title. Yazidi traditional law¬†stipulates that clerics can only hail from specific clans. Alyas’s father was also a Baba Sheikh. Hundreds of worshippers wearing medical masks gathered at the stone shrine of Lalish to pay their respects to the new leader. (AFP)