Mexico
Bloque Negro

Mexico City: militant protest for reproductive rights

A march for abortion rights turned violent in Mexico City as a group of women wearing ski-masks and armed with hammers clashed with police. Members of the Bloque Negro feminist collective joined the protest after departing from the headquarters of the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH), which they had been occupying for weeks and had turned into a shelter for victims of gender violence. With their path to the city’s historic center blocked by riot police, some threw Molotov cocktails¬†and charged the police lines. Some of the women also bared their breasts, even as they wore goggles and helmets. Authorities said 11 police were injured in the confrontation. The demonstration was part of a Day for Decriminalization of Abortion in Latin America & the Caribbean on the eve of International Safe Abortion Day. In Mexico, abortion is only legal in the Federal Distriact and southern state of Oaxaca during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. In the rest of the country, it only permitted under limited circumstances, such as if a woman has been raped. (Photo via¬†Mexico News Daily)

Mexico
guardianacional

Mexico: narco-dystopia amid Trump-AMLO schmooze

Mexico’s President Lopez Obrador met with Trump at the White House to inaugurate the new trade treaty that replaces NAFTA. Embarrassingly, the meeting was punctuated by horrific new outbursts of narco-violence in Mexico. And the country’s promised cannabis legalization‚ÄĒmandated by the high court and looked to as a de-escalation of the dystopian drug war‚ÄĒis stalled by a paralyzed Congress. (Photo:¬†Secretar√≠a de Seguridad y Protecci√≥n Ciudadana)

Mexico
oaxaca

Mexico: comuneros massacred in Oaxaca

An attack by armed men on local comuneros in San Mateo del Mar, in Mexico’s southern Oaxaca state, left at least 15 dead, with several more wounded or reported as “disappeared.” The confrontation began when residents of the outlying community of Huazantl√°n del R√≠o attempted to gather for a public meeting and were blocked by gunmen. Some of the slain were bludgeoned to death, and several appear to have been burned, mutilated or tortured. Huazantl√°n residents claim¬†municipal police were backing up the gunmen in the attack, ostensibly because the gathering violated COVID-19 restrictions. Municipal authorities in turn accuse the Huazantl√°n residents of being involved in criminal gangs, and are calling on state authorities to investigate. (Image: FreeWorldMaps.net)

Mexico
Yucuquimi

Troops occupy ‘autonomous’ pueblo in Oaxaca

Tired of what they call political paralysis and corruption in the local municipal seat of Tezoatl√°n de Segura y Luna, in Mexico’s Oaxaca state, the Mixtec indgenous community of Yucuquimi de Ocampo last month declared itself to be a “free municipality” under its own “autonomous” self-government. Since then, the state and central government have had the community floded with troops both from the army and newly created National Guard force. Residents have clashed with National Guard troops, and local followers of the Agrarian Indigenous Zapatista Movement (MAIZ) marched on the state capital to demand withdrawal of the troops from the community. The Zapatista rebels in neighboring Chiapas state have issued a statement in support of the “free municipality.”¬†(Photo:¬†Pagina3)

Mexico
Mexico police

Mexico: new security force to Guatemalan border

The first mission of the new security force created by Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador will be blocking migrants on the Guatemalan border, evidently part of a deal struck with the Trump administration. Mexico has pledged to deploy up to 6,000 National Guard troops to its southern border in an effort to avoid Trump’s threatened tariff on all exports to the United States. The deal was announced as Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard is leading a Mexican delegation in talks with White House officials in Washington. Mexican officials said that 10 National Guard contingents of 450 to 600 troops each will be assigned to the border with Guatemala by September. The deployment would represent a fourfold increase on the 1,500 federal troops currently patrolling the border. A further three units will be deployed to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico, to set up roadblocks and checkpoints to stop the movement of migrants. (Photo:¬†Mexico News Daily)

Mexico

Mexico: double assassination of indigenous leaders

The Emiliano Zapata Popular and Indigenous Council of Guerrero (CIPOG-EZ) is calling upon the United Nations to investigate following the assassination of two leaders of the organization. The bodies of Jos√© Lucio Bartolo Faustino and Modesto Verales Sebasti√°n were found in the town of Chilapa de Alvarez, where they had days earlier been abducted on a road by unknown gunmen. Both were leaders of the Nahua indigenous community in Chilapa municipality, had served as representatives to the National Indigenous Congress (CNI), and had promoted the 2017 presidential candidacy of Mar√≠a de Jes√ļs Patricio Mart√≠nez, known as “Marichuy,” a Nahua woman who won the support of both the CNI and Mexico’s Zapatista¬†rebels. Both were abducted when they were returning to their communities in outlying villages of Chilapa municipality from a meeting of indigenous leaders in the Guerrero state capital, Chilpancingo. (Image: Somos¬†el Medio)

Mexico

Will AMLO fight for Mexico’s indigenous peoples?

Turkey’s TRT World runs a report recalling the Chontal Maya blockades of the Pemex oil installations in Mexico’s southern state of Tabasco in 1996, to protest the pollution of their lands and waters. This is a struggle that is still being waged today by the Chontal of Tabasco, but back in 1996 the figurehead of the movement was¬†Andr√©s Manuel L√≥pez Obrador (known as AMLO)‚ÄĒnow Mexico’s left-populist president-elect. The report asks if AMLO as president will remain true to the indigenous struggle that first put him on Mexico’s political map. In a segment exploring this question, TRT World speaks with¬†Melissa Ortiz Mass√≥ of the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre¬†and CounterVortex editor Bill Weinberg.¬†

Mexico

Anarchist bomb blasts in Mexico City?

A group called the "Pagan Sect of the Mountain" claimed responsibility for improvised bomb attacks on Mexico City buses, in a communique filled with anti-civilization rhetoric.

Mexico

Mexico: violence continues in wake of elections

Mexico's ruling coalition kept its slim majority in elections marred by violence and assassination of candidates. Striking teachers attempted to disrupt the vote, calling it a farce.

Mexico

Mexico: Zapatistas support striking farmworkers

Zapatista leaders in Chiapas declared support for striking farmworkers in Baja California's San Quintín Valley, who clashed with police at a march for a $13-a-day minium wage.